TD 259: My Literature Notebook (Final Standings)

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Ryno
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TD 259: My Literature Notebook (Final Standings)

Post by Ryno » Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:14 am

Welcome to TD - 259: My Literature Notebook


A year ago, realizing that my knowledge of the all-important trivia category of literature was deficient, I put together a large 225 page notebook with regard to all things literature. All the big names are here, a wide variety of different genres (e.g. poetry, prose and drama) are represented, as well as different time periods. That said, there is a heavy focus on American and English literature from the 19th and 20th centuries. This TD is in honor of the first anniversary of my notebook. All questions and options are taken from my notebook.

The rules:
Give correct answers that match as few of the other players as possible. The goal is to have the fewest amount of points.
• Correct answers score points equal to the number of players who gave that answer.
• Incorrect answers score the SHEEP (most popular answer for that question) plus 5
points.
• You may DROP one question, which will score a 0. Mark it DROP.
• Blank answers will be considered incorrect as will second DROPs.
• Minor spelling or title discrepancies are OK, I’ll be somewhat flexible.
• Tiebreaker is based on order of entry.
• No external help (e.g. Google, Wikipedia).

If corrections are needed please let me know via PM.
Send answers to me via PM. Due by: September 7th at Noon EST.




WORLD LITERATURE – PART I – (Ancient Times to 1900)


Question #1 – Early Stuff and a lot of Shakespeare
Answer one of the options below. I need just one. Just the answer is fine, you do not need to write the letter with your response. Same deal for all of the following questions.

A – This ancient Greek dramatist is known for the plays: Medea, Hippolytus and Electra.
B – This Roman poet’s best known work is Metamorpheses.
C – The Ramayana and Mahabharata were originally written in this language.
D – These are the three parts of Dante’s Divine Comedy.
E – In The Merry Wives of Windsor, this woman is the inn keeper.
F – This Shakespeare comedy is about two sets of identical twins who are switched at birth.
G – The phrase “all the world is a stage” is from this Shakespeare play.
H – Complete this line from Richard III: “I am determined to prove a __________.”
I – This play set during the waning days of the Roman Empire is thought to be Shakespeare’s first tragedy.
J – These three women are the daughters of King Lear.
K – Most of the action in Othello takes place on this Mediterranean island.
L – This Shakespeare play is based on Plutarch’s Lives of the Emperors.


Question #2 – European Lit up through the 19th Century

A – In Don Quioxte, this was the name of Sancho Panza’s donkey.
B – This work by Izaak Walton was about fishing. (Title must be in the original spelling)
C – This novel is believed to have been based on the life of Alexander Selkirk.
D – This essay by Jonathan Swift was a satire about English attitudes towards the Irish.
E – Samuel Taylor Coleridge is believed to have been under the influence of this narcotic when he wrote Kubla Khan.
F – This German writer’s best known work was the play Faust.
G – These five words can be found on line 49 of John Keats’ Ode to a Grecian Urn.
H – In the novel Pride and Prejudice, this character is the oldest of the Bennet sisters.
I – The characters Catherine Morland and Isabella Thorpe are from this Jane Austen novel.
J – This Bronte sister was the middle daughter in her family.
K – This Russian writer’s best known works were: Boris Godunov and Eugene Onegin.
L – This novel contains the line, “if he has a conscience he will suffer for his mistake.”


Question #3 – 19th Century European Lit – Part 1

A – This novel set during the reign of Tsar Nicholas I refers to approximately 160 real life persons.
B – This novel is subtitled “The Parish Boy’s Progress”.
C – This character frequently says the word “umble”.
D – The characters Sydney Carton and Charles Darnay are from this novel.
E – This novelist’s best known words are: Silas Marner and Middlemarch.
F – These are the names of the three musketeers from Dumas’ novel The Three Musketeers.
G – This Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale inspired the musical Once upon a Mattress.
H – This numbered Elizabeth Barrett Browning poem contains the words “how do I love thee”.
I – This poet wrote In Memoriam A.H.H. in honor of a Cambridge friend.
J – This word from the Lewis Carroll poem Jabberwocky means: to move clumsy with heavy tread.
K – This man wrote an 1865 science fiction novel about a journey to the moon.
L – This H. G. Wells novel is about a man who becomes invisible. (Note: Need the exact complete title)


Question #4 – 19th Century European Lit – Part 2

A – This Norwegian playwright’s best known works are: A Doll’s House, Hedda Gabler and Peer Gynt.
B – This titular Checkov character tries to shoot the Professor but fails.
C – This American born ex-pat authored the novels: What Maisie Knew and Turn of the Screw.
D – This titular Kipling character was the orphan son of an Irish soldier.
E – This Oscar Wilde play was based on a Biblical story.
F – The phrase “smoking gun” comes from a story by this British author.
G – This poem, which contains 17 cantos, is considered the magnum opus of Lord Byron.
H – This Russian playwright’s best known work is: The Inspector General.
I – This novel includes the characters Dimitry and Grushenka.
J – This Dickens novel mentions Master Humphrey’s clock and the Poet’s Corner at Westminster Abbey
K – This Dickens work is divided into “chirps” instead of chapters.
L – This was the pen name of the French novelist and memoirist, Ms. Dupin.



AMERICAN LITERATURE



Question #5 – 19th Century

A – This James Fenimore Cooper novel is the second book from The Leatherstocking Tales Series.
B – In Edgar Allen Poe’s The Raven, the titular raven sits on a sculpted bust of this historical figure.
C – This is the Edgar Allen Poe short story that refers to a type of sherry wine in its title.
D – This Nathaniel Hawthorne novel refers to triangular architectural features in its title.
E – William Collen Bryant and John Greenleaf Whittier were nicknamed these type of “homey” New England poets.
F – The poems of this reclusive poet from Amherst, Massachusetts are just numbered without titles.
G – This Walt Whitman poem was often mentioned on the TV series Breaking Bad.
H – This character from the novel Little Women was the oldest sister in the March family.
I – This 1882 novel, by an American author, is set in England in the year 1547.
J – This short story from 1865 has the name of a California administrative jurisdiction in its title.
K – This author penned the 1890 short story: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.
L – This Biblical prophet is mentioned in chapter 83 of the novel Moby Dick.


Question #6 – Early to Mid-20th Century

A – The character Wolf Larsen is the main antagonist in this novel.
B – This was the first novel written by a woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.
C – The writer Gertrude Stein was raised in this California city.
D – The film “A Place in the Sun” is based on this novel.
E – The line “good fences make good neighbors” is from this poem.
F – This 1922 F. Scott Fitzgerald novel portrays New York City café society during the Jazz Age.
G – This man was the first American writer to win the Nobel Prize for literature (1930).
H – This Pulitzer Prize winning play from 1921 is about a former prostitute that falls in love and has difficulty turning her life around.
I – This harrowing Pulitzer Prize winning play is about a dysfunctional family headed by a bitter former actor father and a drug addicted mother.
J – This novel includes the characters Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley.
K – In the novel The Old Man and the Sea, this is the type of species of fish that Santiago tries to catch.
L – This woman, known for her witty quips, was a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table.


Question #7 – Mid-20th Century

A – This novel is about the Compson family.
B – This detective is featured in many Raymond Chandler novels, such as The Big Sleep.
C – This Nathaniel West novel is about the Hollywood film industry during the 1930s.
D – The title of this 1952 novel references Chapter 4 of The Book of Genesis.
E – Sometimes confused with Amy Tan, for some reason, this novelist created the characters Wang Lung and O-Lan.
F – The protagonist of this novel is named Bigger Thomas.
G – In the play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, “Big Daddy” Pollitt is a business tycoon in this industry.
H – This 1964 Saul Bellow novel is about a Jewish man in mid-life crisis, and not about a former St. Louis Cardinals manager.
I – The character Biff Loman from Death of a Salesman played this sport when he was in high school.
J – This novel was carried by Mark David Chapman when he assassinated John Lennon.
K – This 1953 Ralph Ellison novel portrays an unnamed narrator. (Note: Need the exact correct title)
L – Writer Flannery O’Conner’s characters were often described by this term, also a type of features from gothic cathedrals.


Question #8 – Mid-20th Century to Present

A – The typed out roll manuscript for this novel is on display at the Boott Cotton Mill and Museum in Lowell, Massachusetts.
B – This science fiction writer is the author of the novels: The Illustrated Man and Something Wicked This Way Comes.
C – In the novel Catch-22, the character Joseph Yossarian performed this role aboard a B-25 bomber.
D – This writer created the characters Howard Roark and Dagny Taggart.
E – This novel that features the character Kilgore Trout is named after a product advertising slogan.
F – The second most famous writer from Mississippi, her novel The Optimist’s Daughter won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.
G – This 1970 novel by Joan Didion sounds like one of the rules of golf.
H – This ghostwriter for The Autobiography of Malcolm X was once a Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Coast Guard.
I – This novel by Toni Morrison is set in Lorain, Ohio during the 1930s and 1940s.
J – David Foster Wallace passed away during this year, also the peak of popularity for Ed Hardy t-shirts.
K – This Tom Wolfe novel references a sweet flavored instant drink in its title.
L – In Ogden Nash’s poem, Line-Up for Yesterday, “C” stands for this.



WORLD LITERATURE – PART II – (1900 to Present)



Question #9 – Early 20th Century

A – This 1904 Joseph Conrad novel is set in the fictitious South American republic of Costaguana.
B – This 1901 Thomas Mann novel chronicles the decline of a German family.
C – In this novel, the characters Cecil Vyse and Lucy Honeychurch stay in the Pension Bertolini.
D – This Canadian was the author of: Anne of Green Gables.
E – In this novel, the character Paul Morel uses the word “nesh” frequently.
F – The first part of this 7 volume novel is titled “Swann’s Way”. (Note: either of the two common titles for this novel will be accepted)
G – James Joyce wrote Finnegan’s Wake while he resided in this city.
H – This Virginia Woolf novel is set at the Isle of Skye in Scotland.
I – This 1915 T.S. Eliot poem references the Bible, Dante, Shakespeare and John Donne.
J – The title of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World was derived from this Shakespeare play,
K – This writer created the detective duo of Tommy and Tuppence.
L – This was the religion of the aristocratic Marchmain family.


Question #10 – Mid-20th Century

A – This was the language in which most of Samuel Beckett’s works were originally written in.
B – This work by William Butler Yeats is about a journey to Constantinople.
C – In George Orwell’s 1984, this is the name of the torture chamber where a prisoner is subjected to his worst fear.
D – This 1954 Dylan Thomas radio drama is set at a small Welsh fishing village.
E – This Jean Rhys novel served as a “prequel” to Jane Eyre.
F – The “C” in the name Arthur C. Clarke stands for this.
G – C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien both belonged to this Oxford social group.
H – This character from The Lord of the Flies was an epileptic.
I – The original manuscript for Doctor Zhivago was smuggled into this nation, because the USSR would not publish it.
J – This 1961 novel is about an Indo-Trinidadian who strives for success but mostly fails.
K – This 1951 novel by John Wyndham references a type of invasive plant in its title.
L – This writer’s most famous work was: Out of Africa.


Question #11 – Mid/Late 20th Century to Present

A – This novel was set in the town of Macando.
B – This Chilean’s most famous works are: The House of the Spirits and City of the Beasts.
C – This 1980 novel deals with the transition to Indian national independence.
D – This Canadian’s most popular works are: The Handmaid’s Tale, Cat’s Eye and The Robber Bride.
E – In Eugene Ionesco’s most well-known play, the inhabitants of a small French town turn into this species of animal.
F – This Australian was the author of: The Thorn Birds.
G – The author of the plays The Garden Party and The Memorandum later became the president of this nation.
H – This was the actual name of the titular character from Albert Camus’ The Stranger.
I – This work of non-fiction was about Thor Hyerdahl’s sailing raft adventures in the Pacific.
J – This 2004 novel by David Mitchell adapted into film just a few years ago.
K – This 1992 novel by Mexican writer Laura Esquivel revolves around cooking.
L – This Japanese writer’s most well-known work was the 1989 novel: The Remains of the Day.



CHILDREN’S LITERATURE



Question #12 – 20th Century to Present

A – The children’s book James and the Giant Peach is set at this location along the English Channel.
B – This book has been called “the Aeneid of the rabbits.”
C – The Judy Blume character Peter Hatcher was in this grade in elementary school.
D – Maurice Sendak won this award in 1964 for his children’s book: Where the Wild Things Are.
E – This author created the characters Beezus and Ramona.
F – Mulberry Street was named after a street in this hometown of Dr. Seuss.
G – Booksellers note that sales of this book tend to spike up during graduation season.
H – Complete the title of this 1956 Dr. Seuss work: “If I ran the ________”.
I – This children’s author’s most well-known works are: A Wrinkle in Time and A Ring of Endless Light.
J – The children’s author Beatrix Potter contributed to the preservation of this region in England.
K – This work by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1939.
L – One of the protagonists from this 1943 novella was a pilot who was stranded in the desert.
Last edited by Ryno on Sun Sep 13, 2015 1:44 pm, edited 8 times in total.
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:15 am

Participants:

SpoilerShow
1. MarkBarrett
2. immaf
3. 9021amyers
4. gamawire
5. quarterrrican
6. ElendiPickle
7. Peggles
8. Tabby
9. cf22
10. Blue Lion
11. Steppenwolf
12. patkav
13. Peachbox
14. CheezeWhiz
15. Abraxas
16. Leander
17. geolawyerman
18. mennoknight
19. JeopardyMom
20. Vermonter
21. dott888
22. sillymonkey
23. Rackme32
24. goforthetie
25. Magna
26. econgator
Last edited by Ryno on Mon Sep 07, 2015 12:13 pm, edited 7 times in total.
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by 9021amyers » Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:32 pm

Is there a bonus awarded to the first person to point out there are no "E" clues in this game?

mahatma
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by mahatma » Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:56 pm

Ryno wrote: • No external help (e.g. Google, Wikipedia).
Does e.g. mean 'except for'?

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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Mon Aug 31, 2015 1:12 pm

mahatma wrote:
Ryno wrote: • No external help (e.g. Google, Wikipedia).
Does e.g. mean 'except for'?
Nice try. ;) It means "for example."

http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_c ... /eg_ie.htm
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by goforthetie » Mon Aug 31, 2015 3:40 pm

I miss the TD questions that asked for 1 item from a general category of things. Everything now is "answer one of the following 10-12 questions."

I don't mean to pick on you, Ryno; this phenomenon is hardly limited to this TD.

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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by patkav » Mon Aug 31, 2015 3:45 pm

Ryno, I ask this with admiration:

Is creating TDs for us knuckleheads your full-time job now?

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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Mon Aug 31, 2015 6:35 pm

patkav wrote:Ryno, I ask this with admiration:

Is creating TDs for us knuckleheads your full-time job now?
Thanks. I stepped up to do another one when the Board was low on volunteers on the schedule.
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by goatman » Mon Aug 31, 2015 7:17 pm

ZOMG this TD is PURE Atomic No 79! WOW!

I need to get to work on the transport TD but first I'm a dig in to this one! Super clues Ryno!! :D
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by gamawire » Mon Aug 31, 2015 7:25 pm

goforthetie wrote:I miss the TD questions that asked for 1 item from a general category of things. Everything now is "answer one of the following 10-12 questions."

I don't mean to pick on you, Ryno; this phenomenon is hardly limited to this TD.
You're in luck, gfft! That's pretty much what mine is - coming up next week! :D
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Peggles » Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:58 pm

I taught HS English for 34 years. 'Nuff said?

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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by MitchO » Tue Sep 01, 2015 9:54 am

This TD shows that I need to borrow Ryno's Lit Notebook before the next round of tests. :oops:

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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Sat Sep 05, 2015 4:25 pm

Bump. Less than 44 hours to go before the deadline.
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Mon Sep 07, 2015 12:13 pm

OK, deadline has passed. Answers to come. Thanks to everyone who is playing.
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Mon Sep 07, 2015 12:48 pm

Here we go. The first question:


Question #1 – Early Stuff and a lot of Shakespeare

SpoilerShow
A – This ancient Greek dramatist is known for the plays: Medea, Hippolytus and Electra.
B – This Roman poet’s best known work is Metamorpheses.
C – The Ramayana and Mahabharata were originally written in this language.
D – These are the three parts of Dante’s Divine Comedy.
E – In The Merry Wives of Windsor, this woman is the inn keeper.
F – This Shakespeare comedy is about two sets of identical twins who are switched at birth.
G – The phrase “all the world is a stage” is from this Shakespeare play.
H – Complete this line from Richard III: “I am determined to prove a __________.”
I – This play set during the waning days of the Roman Empire is thought to be Shakespeare’s first tragedy.
J – These three women are the daughters of King Lear.
K – Most of the action in Othello takes place on this Mediterranean island.
L – This Shakespeare play is based on Plutarch’s Lives of the Emperors.
Your answers:



Ovid - (6) (CO-SHEEP) (B)
sillymonkey
Vermonter
JeopardyMom
mennoknight
Tabby
MarkBarrett

Goneril, Regan & Cordelia - (6) (CO-SHEEP) (J)
econgator
Abraxas
Peachbox
Blue Lion
quarterrican
gamawire

The Comedy of Errors - (Doubleton) (F)
Magna
cf22

Euripides - (Doubleton) (A)
goforthetie
geolawyerman

Sanskrit - (Doubleton) (C)
Rackme32
9021amyers

Cyprus - (Doubleton) (K)
Leander
patkav

Inferno, Purgatorio & Paradisio - (Doubleton) (D)
CheezeWhiz
Steppenwolf

As You Like It - (Singleton !) (G)
Peggles

Mistress Quickly - (Singleton !) (E)
ElendiPickle

DROP
None.

Incorrect Answers
Point = dott888
Aeschylus = immaf

Unused Answers
Villain - (H)
Titus Andronicus - (I)
Antony and Cleopatra - (L)
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Mon Sep 07, 2015 1:34 pm

Next the second question:


Question #2 – European Lit up through the 19th Century

SpoilerShow
A – In Don Quioxte, this was the name of Sancho Panza’s donkey.
B – This work by Izaak Walton was about fishing. (Title must be in the original spelling)
C – This novel is believed to have been based on the life of Alexander Selkirk.
D – This essay by Jonathan Swift was a satire about English attitudes towards the Irish.
E – Samuel Taylor Coleridge is believed to have been under the influence of this narcotic when he wrote Kubla Khan.
F – This German writer’s best known work was the play Faust.
G – These five words can be found on line 49 of John Keats’ Ode to a Grecian Urn.
H – In the novel Pride and Prejudice, this character is the oldest of the Bennet sisters.
I – The characters Catherine Morland and Isabella Thorpe are from this Jane Austen novel.
J – This Bronte sister was the middle daughter in her family.
K – This Russian writer’s best known works were: Boris Godunov and Eugene Onegin.
L – This novel contains the line, “if he has a conscience he will suffer for his mistake.”


Here were your answers:


Alexander Pushkin - (5) (SHEEP) (K)
geolawyerman
Leander
CheezeWhiz
patkav
quarterrican

The Compleat Angler - (4) (B)
Rackme32
9021amyers
immaf
Vermonter

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe - (4) (F)
sillymonkey
dott888
Peachbox
Blue Lion

A Modest Proposal - (4) (D)
Steppenwolf
Tabby
gamawire
mennoknight

Robinson Crusoe - (Doubleton) (C)
Magna
Peggles

"beauty is truth, truth beauty" - (Doubleton) (G)
goforthetie
cf22

Northanger Abbey - (Doubleton) (I)
JeopardyMom
ElendiPickle

Jane Bennett - (Singleton !) (H)
Abraxas

Opium - (Singleton !) (E)
MarkBarrett

DROP
None.

Incorrect Answers
Rocinante = econgator

Unused Answers
El Rucio - (A)
Emily Bonte - (J)
Crime and Punishment - (L)
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by econgator » Mon Sep 07, 2015 5:19 pm

Ryno wrote:Incorrect Answers
Rocinante = econgator
Horse, donkey, same thing ...

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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Mon Sep 07, 2015 6:44 pm

econgator wrote:
Ryno wrote:Incorrect Answers
Rocinante = econgator
Horse, donkey, same thing ...
It was Sancho Panza's ride I was looking for. Not Don Quixote's.

https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/i ... 750AA9aoqi
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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by econgator » Mon Sep 07, 2015 6:50 pm

Ryno wrote:
econgator wrote:
Ryno wrote:Incorrect Answers
Rocinante = econgator
Horse, donkey, same thing ...
It was Sancho Panza's ride I was looking for. Not Don Quixote's.

https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/i ... 750AA9aoqi
Obviously, I didn't read past "In Don Quixote..." :)

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Re: TD 259: My Literature Notebook

Post by Ryno » Tue Sep 08, 2015 9:11 am

Question #3:


Question #3 – 19th Century European Lit – Part 1

SpoilerShow
A – This novel set during the reign of Tsar Nicholas I refers to approximately 160 real life persons.
B – This novel is subtitled “The Parish Boy’s Progress”.
C – This character frequently says the word “umble”.
D – The characters Sydney Carton and Charles Darnay are from this novel.
E – This novelist’s best known words are: Silas Marner and Middlemarch.
F – These are the names of the three musketeers from Dumas’ novel The Three Musketeers.
G – This Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale inspired the musical Once upon a Mattress.
H – This numbered Elizabeth Barrett Browning poem contains the words “how do I love thee”.
I – This poet wrote In Memoriam A.H.H. in honor of a Cambridge friend.
J – This word from the Lewis Carroll poem Jabberwocky means: to move clumsy with heavy tread.
K – This man wrote an 1865 science fiction novel about a journey to the moon.
L – This H. G. Wells novel is about a man who becomes invisible. (Note: Need the exact complete title)

Here were your answers:



George Elliot - (4) (CO-SHEEP) (E)
Rackme32
cf22
ElendiPickle
gamawire

The Princess and the Pea - (4) (CO-SHEEP) (G)
Vermonter
Leander
CheezeWhiz
Peggles

A Tale of Two Cities - (3) (D)
econgator
quarterrican
MarkBarrett

Jules Verne - (3) (K)
dott888
Blue Lion
9021amyers

Athos, Porthos & Aramis - (3) (F)
JeopardyMom
mennoknight
Peachbox

Alfred Tennyson - (Doubleton) (I)
Magna
geolawyerman

Uriah Heep - (Doubleton) (C)
Steppenwolf
Tabby

War and Peace - (Singleton !) (A)
goforthetie

Oliver Twist - (Singleton !) (B)
Abraxas

Galumphing - (Singleton !) (J)
patkav

DROP
sillymonkey

Incorrect Answers
David Copperfield = immaf

Unused Answers
Sonnet #43 - (H)
The Invisible Man - (L)
One time swimmer in the Jeopardy! pool

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